Report Update

Forecasting the future of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Canada

Using existing data and a quantitative model, a panel of experts found that, in Canada, 26% of infections are resistant to the drugs generally used to treat them. By 2050, resistance rates are likely to rise to 40%. That could result in the loss of 396,000 lives and $396 billion in GDP. 

The tools below will let you dig deeper into the numbers, projecting lives and GDP loss as the incidence and resistance of infections change.

By 2050, a total of lives could be lost in Canada.

Overall resistance rate in 2018
Likely resistance rate in 2050 as predicted by the expert panel
26% 100%
20

The resistance rate refers to the proportion of infections that don’t respond to the drugs generally used to treat them. Rising resistance could be mitigated by careful stewardship of antimicrobial use and ongoing research into alternative treatment strategies.

0% 40%
100

The incidence rate indicates how frequently infections occur. Effective infection prevention and control initiatives can reduce incidence rates. The baseline incidence rate is the 2018 average (2,600 per 100,000 people).

By 2050, AMR could reduce Canada’s annual GDP by B

Overall resistance rate in 2018
Likely resistance rate in 2050 as predicted by the expert panel
26% 100%
20

The resistance rate refers to the proportion of infections that don’t respond to the drugs generally used to treat them. Rising resistance could be mitigated by careful stewardship of antimicrobial use and ongoing research into alternative treatment strategies.

0% 40%
100

The incidence rate indicates how frequently infections occur. Effective infection prevention and control initiatives can reduce incidence rates. The baseline incidence rate is the 2018 average (2,600 per 100,000 people).

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